BUILDING THE WORLD

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The Spanish Civil War obliterated the Basque Renaissance of the first part of the 20th century. From the 60s on, the Basque language, marginalized to the sphere of the family, began to occupy public spaces: culture, education, media… At the same time, linguists began standardization of the language.

In the late 20th and early 21st century Basque language has recovered its presence in some territories where it was gone and has gained some functions (especially in the Southern Basque Country). At the same time, it has also suffered several regressions (especially in Northern Basque Country). Moreover, the language has become increasingly urban. Today most Basque speakers live in cities or large towns.

However, the community continues minoritised: all living spaces are offered in French and Spanish, languages whose knowledge is required by law.

At the beginning of the 21st century, the Basque language has raised new questions and challenges. They must be answered, as it has been done until now, if Basque language is going to exist in the sea of the world languages.

 


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Interviews:

Jose Angel Irigaray: writer and culture maker
Jon Sarasua: culture maker and university lecturer
Amaia Aire: teacher and musician
Iratxe Esnaola: computer scientist and member of the PuntuEus association.

Music:
Ruper Ordorika, Ibon Rodriguez, Ibon Agirre